Lord Howe woodhens back on track - National Tree Day Blog

Lord Howe woodhens back on track


After requiring the introduction of a captive management program last year, Lord Howe Island’s entire population of endangered woodhens have been successfully reintroduced to the wild.

After requiring the introduction of a captive management program last year, Lord Howe Island’s entire population of endangered woodhens have been successfully reintroduced to the wild.

The birds had to be taken into captivity after a break-out of introduced rodents threatened their survival on the world-heritage-listed island, located around 600 kilometres off the coast of NSW. The outbreak forced the hand of the local Port Macquarie council, leading them to embark on a large-scale rodent eradication program.

The island’s entire woodhen population, around 230 birds, and much of the Lord Howe Island currawong population were captured and placed in specially designed enclosures before the rodent eradication began midway through last year. Due to the remote location of the birds’ mountainous habitats, helicopters were required during the process of both capturing and releasing the animals.

Leslie Williams, the Member for Port Macquarie, described the project to ABC News as the “largest single conservation action in the state’s history”. 

"It was made possible thanks to a partnership between the Lord Howe Island Board and Department of Planning Industry and Environment."

The rodent eradication program has also been a great success, with conservationists now planning to monitor rodent presence on the island. Strict biosecurity measures have been enforced and researchers will be undertaking ongoing surveillance to gauge the impact of the program on the wider ecosystem.

Rangers say the early evidence suggests both the woodhens and currawongs are happy to be back in the wild and have already resumed breeding.

 

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Liam Taylor

Prior to joining Planet Ark Liam spent his time studying global environmental issues, travelling Southeast Asia on the cheap and working for a sustainable property management company in Bali, Indonesia. Joining the communications team at Planet Ark, he hopes to inspire positive environmental behaviour through effective and positive messaging.